Biography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Samuel Nathaniel Behrman (June 9, 1893 – September 9, 1973) was an American playwright, screenwriter, biographer, and longtime writer for The New Yorker. His son is the composer David Behrman.

Behrman's family immigrated from what is now Lithuania to the United States, where Samuel Nathaniel Behrman was born, the youngest of three sons, in a tenement in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1893.

From the late 1920s through the 1940s, S. N. Behrman was considered one of Broadway's leading authors of "high comedy," was often produced by the famous Theatre Guild, and wrote for such stars as Ina Claire, Katharine Cornell, Jane Cowl, and the acting team of Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, who became his good friends. In Hollywood, Behrman enjoyed a lucrative second career as a screenwriter. He wrote screenplays for Greta Garbo, including Queen Christina, Conquest, and her final film, Two-Faced Woman. With Sonya Levien, he co-wrote the screen play for the 1930 film version of Ferenc Molnár's Liliom, starring Charles Farrell and Rose Hobart. His experiences in Hollywood found dramatic form in the play Let Me Hear the Melody (1951), a failure that closed in pre-Broadway tryouts. He also collaborated on the screenplays for Anna Karenina (1935), A Tale of Two Cities (1935), and Waterloo Bridge (1940).

S. N. Behrman died in 1973 at the age of eighty. He was survived by his wife, Elza Heifetz Behrman, the sister of violinist Jascha Heifetz, whom he had married in his forties, and a son

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Samuel Nathaniel Behrman (June 9, 1893 – September 9, 1973) was an American playwright, screenwriter, biographer, and longtime writer for The New Yorker. His son is the composer David Behrman.

Behrman's family immigrated from what is now Lithuania to the United States, where Samuel Nathaniel Behrman was born, the youngest of three sons, in a tenement in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1893.

From the late 1920s through the 1940s, S. N. Behrman was considered one of Broadway's leading authors of "high comedy," was often produced by the famous Theatre Guild, and wrote for such stars as Ina Claire, Katharine Cornell, Jane Cowl, and the acting team of Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, who became his good friends. In Hollywood, Behrman enjoyed a lucrative second career as a screenwriter. He wrote screenplays for Greta Garbo, including Queen Christina, Conquest, and her final film, Two-Faced Woman. With Sonya Levien, he co-wrote the screen play for the 1930 film version of Ferenc Molnár's Liliom, starring Charles Farrell and Rose Hobart. His experiences in Hollywood found dramatic form in the play Let Me Hear the Melody (1951), a failure that closed in pre-Broadway tryouts. He also collaborated on the screenplays for Anna Karenina (1935), A Tale of Two Cities (1935), and Waterloo Bridge (1940).

S. N. Behrman died in 1973 at the age of eighty. He was survived by his wife, Elza Heifetz Behrman, the sister of violinist Jascha Heifetz, whom he had married in his forties, and a son

Personal Info

Known For Writing

Gender Male

Known Credits 25

Birthday 1893-06-09

Day of Death 1973-09-09

Place of Birth Worcester, Massachusetts, USA

Official Site -

Also Known As

  • Sam Bermann

Writing TV ShowsMovies

1961 FannyTheatre Play
1958 Me and the ColonelScreenplay
1956 GabyScreenplay
1951 Quo VadisScreenplay
1941 Two-Faced WomanScreenplay
1940 Waterloo BridgeScreenplay
1938 The Cowboy and the LadyScreenplay
1937 ConquestWriter
1937 ParnellScreenplay
1935 A Tale of Two CitiesScreenplay
1935 Anna KareninaDialogue
1935 Biography of a Bachelor GirlAuthor
1934 The Scarlet PimpernelWriter
1933 Queen ChristinaDialogue
1933 My Lips BetrayWriter
1933 Brief MomentAuthor
1933 Hallelujah I'm a BumScreenplay
1932 Tess of the Storm CountryWriter
1931 SurrenderWriter
1931 The BratWriter
1931 Daddy Long LegsWriter
1931 The Man Who Came BackWriter
1930 Lightnin'Writer
1930 LiliomDialogue
1930 LiliomScreenplay

Crew

1959 Ben-HurAdditional Writing

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