Biography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fannie Hurst (October 19, 1885 – February 23, 1968) was an American novelist and short-story writer whose works were highly popular during the post-World War I era. Her work combined sentimental, romantic themes with social issues of the day, such as women's rights and race relations. She was one of the most widely read female authors of the 20th century, and for a time in the 1920s she was one of the highest-paid American writers, along with Booth Tarkington. Hurst also actively supported a number of social causes, including feminism, African American equality, and New Deal programs.

Although her novels, including Lummox (1923), Back Street (1931), and Imitation of Life (1933), lost popularity over time and were mostly out-of-print as of the 2000s, they were bestsellers when first published and were translated into many languages. She also published over 300 short stories during her lifetime. Hurst is known for the film adaptations of her works, including Imitation of Life (1934), starring Claudette Colbert, Louise Beavers, Fredi Washington, and Warren William; Imitation of Life (1959), starring Lana Turner; Humoresque (1946), starring Joan Crawford; and Young at Heart (1954), starring Frank Sinatra.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fannie Hurst (October 19, 1885 – February 23, 1968) was an American novelist and short-story writer whose works were highly popular during the post-World War I era. Her work combined sentimental, romantic themes with social issues of the day, such as women's rights and race relations. She was one of the most widely read female authors of the 20th century, and for a time in the 1920s she was one of the highest-paid American writers, along with Booth Tarkington. Hurst also actively supported a number of social causes, including feminism, African American equality, and New Deal programs.

Although her novels, including Lummox (1923), Back Street (1931), and Imitation of Life (1933), lost popularity over time and were mostly out-of-print as of the 2000s, they were bestsellers when first published and were translated into many languages. She also published over 300 short stories during her lifetime. Hurst is known for the film adaptations of her works, including Imitation of Life (1934), starring Claudette Colbert, Louise Beavers, Fredi Washington, and Warren William; Imitation of Life (1959), starring Lana Turner; Humoresque (1946), starring Joan Crawford; and Young at Heart (1954), starring Frank Sinatra.

Personal Info

Known For Writing

Gender Female

Known Credits 19

Birthday 1885-10-19

Day of Death 1968-02-23

Place of Birth Hamilton, Ohio, USA

Official Site -

Also Known As

  • Fannie Hurst's Back Street

Writing TV ShowsMovies

1961 Back Street Novel
1959 Imitation of Life Novel
1954 Young at Heart Story
1948 Angelitos negros Novel
1947 Humoresque Story
1941 Four Mothers Story
1939 Four Wives Story
1938 Four Daughters Writer
1934 Imitation of Life Novel
1932 Symphony of Six Million Story
1931 Five and Ten Novel
1930 Back Pay Story
1926 Mannequin Story
1922 Stardust Novel
1922 Back Pay Novel
1921 Just Around the Corner Story
1920 Humoresque Story
1919 A Petal on the Current Story

Editing

1937 Skeleton on Horseback Additional Editing

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