Biography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Preston Sturges (29 August 1898 – 6 August 1959), originally Edmund Preston Biden, was a celebrated playwright, screenwriter and film director born in Chicago, Illinois. In 1941 he won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for the film The Great McGinty.

Sturges took the screwball comedy format of the 1930s to another level, writing dialogue that, heard today, is often surprisingly naturalistic, mature, and ahead of its time, despite the farcical situations.

In recent years, film scholars such as Alessandro Pirolini have also argued that Sturges' cinema anticipated more experimental narratives by contemporary directors such as Joel and Ethan Coen, Robert Zemeckis, and Woody Allen, along with prolific The Simpsons writer John Swartzwelder: "Many of [Sturges'] movies and screenplays reveal a restless and impatient attempt to escape codified rules and narrative schemata, and to push the mechanisms and conventions of their genre to the extent of unveiling them to the spectator. [See for example] the disruption of standardized timelines in films such as The Power and the Glory and The Great McGinty [or the way] an apparently classical comedy such as Unfaithfully Yours (1948) shifts into the realm of multiple and hypothetical narratives.

Prior to Sturges, other figures in Hollywood (such as Charlie Chaplin, D.W. Griffith, and Frank Capra) had directed films from their own scripts. However, Sturges is often regarded as the first Hollywood figure to be initially mainly successfully established as a screenwriter and then to subsequently move into directing his own scripts, at a time when those roles were mostly entrenched and separate. Famously, Sturges sold the story for The Great McGinty to Paramount Pictures for $1, in return for being allowed to direct the film; the sum was quietly raised to $10 by the studio for legal reasons.

Description above from the Wikipedia article Preston Sturges, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.

Read More

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Preston Sturges (29 August 1898 – 6 August 1959), originally Edmund Preston Biden, was a celebrated playwright, screenwriter and film director born in Chicago, Illinois. In 1941 he won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for the film The Great McGinty.

Sturges took the screwball comedy format of the 1930s to another level, writing dialogue that, heard today, is often surprisingly naturalistic, mature, and ahead of its time, despite the farcical situations.

In recent years, film scholars such as Alessandro Pirolini have also argued that Sturges' cinema anticipated more experimental narratives by contemporary directors such as Joel and Ethan Coen, Robert Zemeckis, and Woody Allen, along with prolific The Simpsons writer John Swartzwelder: "Many of [Sturges'] movies and screenplays reveal a restless and impatient attempt to escape codified rules and narrative schemata, and to push the mechanisms and conventions of their genre to the extent of unveiling them to the spectator. [See for example] the disruption of standardized timelines in films such as The Power and the Glory and The Great McGinty [or the way] an apparently classical comedy such as Unfaithfully Yours (1948) shifts into the realm of multiple and hypothetical narratives.

Prior to Sturges, other figures in Hollywood (such as Charlie Chaplin, D.W. Griffith, and Frank Capra) had directed films from their own scripts. However, Sturges is often regarded as the first Hollywood figure to be initially mainly successfully established as a screenwriter and then to subsequently move into directing his own scripts, at a time when those roles were mostly entrenched and separate. Famously, Sturges sold the story for The Great McGinty to Paramount Pictures for $1, in return for being allowed to direct the film; the sum was quietly raised to $10 by the studio for legal reasons.

Description above from the Wikipedia article Preston Sturges, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.

Personal Info

Known For Writing

Gender Male

Known Credits 33

Birthday 1898-08-29

Day of Death 1959-08-06

Place of Birth Chicago, Illinois, USA

Official Site -

Also Known As

  • -

Writing TV ShowsMovies

1958 Rock-a-Bye BabyScreenplay
1949 The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful BendWriter
1948 Unfaithfully YoursScreenplay
1947 The Sin of Harold DiddlebockScreenplay
1947 I'll Be YoursScreenplay
1944 The Great MomentScreenplay
1944 Hail the Conquering HeroWriter
1944 The Miracle of Morgan’s CreekWriter
1942 The Palm Beach StoryScreenplay
1941 Sullivan's TravelsWriter
1941 New York TownWriter
1941 The Lady EveScreenplay
1941 Safeguarding Military InformationWriter
1940 Christmas in JulyWriter
1940 The Great McGintyWriter
1940 Remember the NightScreenplay
1939 Never Say DieScreenplay
1938 If I Were KingWriter
1938 Port of Seven SeasWriter
1937 Easy LivingScreenplay
1937 Hotel HaywireWriter
1936 Love Before BreakfastWriter
1935 Diamond JimWriter
1935 The Good FairyWriter
1934 We Live AgainAdaptation
1934 Thirty Day PrincessScreenplay
1933 The Power and the GloryWriter
1933 Child of ManhattanTheatre Play
1930 The Big PondDialogue

Directing

1955 The Diary of Major ThompsonDirector
1950 VendettaDirector
1949 The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful BendDirector
1948 Unfaithfully YoursDirector
1947 The Sin of Harold DiddlebockDirector
1944 The Great MomentDirector
1944 Hail the Conquering HeroDirector
1944 The Miracle of Morgan’s CreekDirector
1942 The Palm Beach StoryDirector
1941 Sullivan's TravelsDirector
1941 The Lady EveDirector
1941 Safeguarding Military InformationDirector
1940 Christmas in JulyDirector
1940 The Great McGintyDirector

Production

1949 The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful BendProducer
1948 Unfaithfully YoursProducer
1944 The Miracle of Morgan’s CreekProducer

Acting

1958 Paris Holiday as Serge Vitry
1942 Star Spangled Rhythm as Preston Sturges
1940 Christmas in July as Man at Shoeshine Stand (uncredited)

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