Biography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (10 October 1930 – 24 December 2008), was an English playwright, screenwriter, actor, theatre director, poet, left-wing political activist, cricket enthusiast, and Nobel laureate. He was one of the most influential and imitated of modern British dramatists. Pinter's writing career spanned over 50 years and produced 29 original stage plays, 27 screenplays, many dramatic sketches, radio and TV plays, poetry, one novel, short fiction, essays, speeches, and letters. His best-known plays include The Birthday Party (1957), The Caretaker (1959), The Homecoming (1964), and Betrayal (1978), each of which he adapted to film. His screenplay adaptations of others' works include The Servant (1963), The Go-Between (1970), The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981), The Trial (1993), and Sleuth (2007). He directed almost 50 stage, television, and film productions and acted extensively in radio, stage, television, and film productions of his own and others' works.

Pinter's dramas often involve strong conflicts between ambivalent characters who struggle for verbal and territorial dominance and for their own versions of the past. Stylistically, these works are marked by theatrical pauses and silences, comedic timing, irony, and menace. Thematically ambiguous, they raise complex issues of individual identity oppressed by social forces, language, and vicissitudes of memory. In 1981, Pinter stated that he was not inclined to write plays explicitly about political subjects; yet in the mid 1980s he began writing overtly political plays. This "new direction" in his work and his left-wing political activism stimulated additional critical debate. Pinter, his work, and his politics have been the subject of voluminous critical commentary.

Pinter received over 50 awards, prizes, and other honours, including the Tony Award for Best Play for The Homecoming in 1967, eight BAFTA awards for screenwriting and a BAFTA Fellowship in 1997, the French Légion d'honneur in 2007, and 20 honorary degrees. Festivals and symposia have been devoted to him and his work. In awarding Pinter the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2005, the Swedish Academy noted: "Harold Pinter is generally seen as the foremost representative of British drama in the second half of the 20th century. That he occupies a position as a modern classic is illustrated by his name entering the language as an adjective used to describe a particular atmosphere and environment in drama: 'Pinteresque'."

Despite frail health after being diagnosed with oesophageal cancer in December 2001, Pinter continued to act on stage and screen, last performing the title role of Samuel Beckett's one-act monologue, Krapp's Last Tape, for the 50th anniversary season of the Royal Court Theatre, in October 2006. He died from liver cancer on 24 December 2008. The following week he was buried at Kensal Green Cemetery, in North West London.

Description above from the Wikipedia article Harold Pinter, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (10 October 1930 – 24 December 2008), was an English playwright, screenwriter, actor, theatre director, poet, left-wing political activist, cricket enthusiast, and Nobel laureate. He was one of the most influential and imitated of modern British dramatists. Pinter's writing career spanned over 50 years and produced 29 original stage plays, 27 screenplays, many dramatic sketches, radio and TV plays, poetry, one novel, short fiction, essays, speeches, and letters. His best-known plays include The Birthday Party (1957), The Caretaker (1959), The Homecoming (1964), and Betrayal (1978), each of which he adapted to film. His screenplay adaptations of others' works include The Servant (1963), The Go-Between (1970), The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981), The Trial (1993), and Sleuth (2007). He directed almost 50 stage, television, and film productions and acted extensively in radio, stage, television, and film productions of his own and others' works.

Pinter's dramas often involve strong conflicts between ambivalent characters who struggle for verbal and territorial dominance and for their own versions of the past. Stylistically, these works are marked by theatrical pauses and silences, comedic timing, irony, and menace. Thematically ambiguous, they raise complex issues of individual identity oppressed by social forces, language, and vicissitudes of memory. In 1981, Pinter stated that he was not inclined to write plays explicitly about political subjects; yet in the mid 1980s he began writing overtly political plays. This "new direction" in his work and his left-wing political activism stimulated additional critical debate. Pinter, his work, and his politics have been the subject of voluminous critical commentary.

Pinter received over 50 awards, prizes, and other honours, including the Tony Award for Best Play for The Homecoming in 1967, eight BAFTA awards for screenwriting and a BAFTA Fellowship in 1997, the French Légion d'honneur in 2007, and 20 honorary degrees. Festivals and symposia have been devoted to him and his work. In awarding Pinter the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2005, the Swedish Academy noted: "Harold Pinter is generally seen as the foremost representative of British drama in the second half of the 20th century. That he occupies a position as a modern classic is illustrated by his name entering the language as an adjective used to describe a particular atmosphere and environment in drama: 'Pinteresque'."

Despite frail health after being diagnosed with oesophageal cancer in December 2001, Pinter continued to act on stage and screen, last performing the title role of Samuel Beckett's one-act monologue, Krapp's Last Tape, for the 50th anniversary season of the Royal Court Theatre, in October 2006. He died from liver cancer on 24 December 2008. The following week he was buried at Kensal Green Cemetery, in North West London.

Description above from the Wikipedia article Harold Pinter, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia

Personal Info

Known For Writing

Gender Male

Known Credits 63

Birthday 1930-10-10

Day of Death 2008-12-24

Place of Birth Hackney, east London, England

Official Site -

Also Known As

  • -

Writing TV ShowsMovies

2016 National Theatre Live: No Man's Land Writer
2010 Harold Pinter: A Celebration Writer
2007 Sleuth Screenplay
2007 Celebration Writer
2007 Le gardien Author
2004 The Caretaker Author
2002 The Dwarfs Writer
1999 Against the War Writer
1995 Landscape Writer
1993 The Trial Screenplay
1991 Old Times Writer
1990 The Handmaid's Tale Screenplay
1990 The Comfort of Strangers Screenplay
1989 The Heat of the Day Writer
1989 Reunion Screenplay
1988 Mountain Language Writer
1987 The Birthday Party Writer
1987 Basements Writer
1985 Turtle Diary Screenplay
1985 One for the Road Writer
1984 A Kind of Alaska Writer
1983 Betrayal Writer
1983 Landscape Writer
1982 The Hothouse Writer
1981 The French Lieutenant's Woman Screenplay
1981 The Caretaker Writer
1978 No Man's Land Writer
1978 Langrishe, Go Down Screenplay
1976 Laurence Olivier Presents (1 episode)Writer
1976 The Last Tycoon Screenplay
1976 The Collection Screenplay
1975 Old Times Writer
1975 Arena (133 episodes)Writer
1973 The Homecoming Theatre Play Screenplay
1973 Monologue Writer
1971 The Go-Between Screenplay
1968 The Birthday Party Theatre Play Screenplay
1967 The Basement Writer
1967 A Night Out Writer
1967 A Slight Ache Writer
1967 Accident Screenplay
1966 The Quiller Memorandum Screenplay
1966 Modesty Blaise Screenplay
1965 Tea Party Writer
1964 The Pumpkin Eater Screenplay
1963 The Servant Screenplay
1963 The Caretaker Writer
1963 The Lover Writer
1960 A Night Out Writer

Acting

2007 Sleuth as Man on T.V.
2007 Krapp's Last Tape as Krapp
2001 The Tailor of Panama as Uncle Benny
2001 Wit as Mr. Bearing
2000 Catastrophe as The Director
1999 Mansfield Park as Sir Thomas Bertram
1999 Against the War as himself
1997 Mojo as Sam Ross
1996 Breaking the Code as John Smith
1987 The Birthday Party as Nat Goldberg
1985 Turtle Diary as Man in Bookshop
1981 Poets Against the Bomb
1981 The South Bank Show: The French Lieutenant's Woman as Interviewee
1978 Langrishe, Go Down as Barry Shannon
1978 The South Bank Show (1 episode)
1976 Rogue Male as Saul Abrahams
1973 Monologue
1967 The Basement as Stott
1967 Accident as Bell
1964 In Camera as Garcin
1963 The Servant as Society Man
1963 The Caretaker as Man

Directing

1995 Landscape Director
1988 Mountain Language Director
1982 The Hothouse Director
1978 Die Geburtstagsfeier Director
1974 Butley Director

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