17 Changes

March 14, 2018
en-US
biography u
  • Brakhage, born in 1933 in Kansas City, Missouri, is known for the personal character of his films. According to Mr. Richie, "He makes his pictures as lyric poets make their poems." Just as the poet tries to make one feel, so Brakhage wants to make the viewer see. He finds sight "dulled by the daily uses to which we must put it," and he attempts to recapture in his work the art of vision. To many poets and filmmakers the work of Brakhage has been, with its new ideas of vision, a mother lode of expanded techniques and fresh approaches. According to Sheldon Renan, author of "The Underground Film", Brakhage films "present a rippling reality in which the photographic raw material of the filmmaker's actual life is repeatedly transformed and reseen in a continual turbulence of movement, of color, of light."
  • Stan Brakhage is one of the most influential filmmakers in American avant-garde cinema, noted for his unflinching social commentaries and technical innovations. Over his nearly 40-year career, he has made over 200 films of varying length. He made his first film, Interim (1952) at age 18 after dropping out of college. Brakhage films seek to change the way we see. They encourage viewers to eschew traditional narrative structure in favor of pure visual perception that is not reliant on naming what is seen; rather his goal is to create a more visceral visual experience, for he believes that a "stream-of visual-consciousness could be nothing less than the pathway of the soul." To this end, his films are shot in highly sensual colors and utilize minimal soundtracks.
  • Brakhage considers the camera analogous to the eye, and film analogous to vision. His concept of vision "includes such things as the flashing abstract patterns the eye sees when shut, visual memories, imaginations, hallucinations, daydreams and night dreams," notes Renan. "With distorting lenses, scratching, painting, superimpositions, editing and other methods of manipulating light, he has tried to put this composite vision on film." Considered the major figure in the break from traditional film to purely personal and visual preoccupations, Brakhage thinks "there is no place for an artist in the film studios." When he lived in New York he stayed with Maya Deren, the avant-garde filmmaker, was a friend of Marie Menken, also an experimental filmmaker, and worked with Joseph Cornell, the artist who suggested a film momento of the Third Avenue El, make by Brakhage, and titled "The Wonder Ring."
  • Brakhage's application of the art of vision has created many different kinds of film experiences. The eye learns to see things outside of their common context, as in "Nightcats", in which Brakhage approximates the vision of cats, or in "Anticipation of the Night", where he shows us the world through the innocent eyes of a child. For Brakhage, the camera-eye is capable of much more than realism. In fact, "The 'absolute realism' of the motion picture image is human invention," he says, "a twentieth-century Western illusion." He believes that the filmmaker can hand-hold the camera and inherit worlds of space, that he can use filters, such as fog, rain, light, glass, and he can "deliberately spit on the lens or wreck its focal intentions.". In sum, the reality of Brakhage is the reality of the "lost" art of vision itself. As he says, "To search for human visual realities man must, as in all other homo-motivation, transcend the original physical restrictions and inherit the world of eyes."
  • His work can be divided into distinct periods. His first short films explored the properties and possibilities of light. In many of his experimental ventures, Brakhage has forgone traditional cinematography in favor of working directly with the film stock itself. He has occasionally painted, inked, scratched and dyed images onto it; he has also tried pasting organic objects on the film. His most famous example is the 1963 short Mothlight in which he glued moth wings onto the stock. Some of his early films were based on his most intimate experiences that included making love to his new bride--depicted on negative film--in Wedlock House: An Intercourse (1959), and an attempt to bring his dead dog back to life with a camera in Sirius Remembered (1959). During the 1960s, Brakhage's iconoclastic views were celebrated for their poetry, but during the '70s, his focus changed to social issues and he alienated many supporters with such disturbing film series as the "Pittsburgh documents" in which he presented many gruesome views of inner city life with films such as Act of Seeing with One's Own Eyes (1971) which was shot in a morgue. He also continued with autobiographical material with the "Sincerity/Duplicity series. During the 1980s, Brakhage's focus again changed--this time he became intrigued with creating truly "abstract" films such as Arabics (1982) which consists of brilliant bursts of colored light which he claims, represent "envisioned music." In addition to filmmaking, Brakhage also wrote books about films and filmmaking and also served as a teacher.
February 9, 2018
en-US
biography u
  • Born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1933, Brakhage moved to Denver, Colorado at the age of six. He sang as a boy soprano soloist, dreamed of being a poet, and graduated from South High School in 1951 with a scholarship to Dartmouth. After one semester, he left to pursue a life in the Arts, returning to Denver to make his first film in 1952.
  • Brakhage, born in 1933 in Kansas City, Missouri, is known for the personal character of his films. According to Mr. Richie, "He makes his pictures as lyric poets make their poems." Just as the poet tries to make one feel, so Brakhage wants to make the viewer see. He finds sight "dulled by the daily uses to which we must put it," and he attempts to recapture in his work the art of vision. To many poets and filmmakers the work of Brakhage has been, with its new ideas of vision, a mother lode of expanded techniques and fresh approaches. According to Sheldon Renan, author of "The Underground Film", Brakhage films "present a rippling reality in which the photographic raw material of the filmmaker's actual life is repeatedly transformed and reseen in a continual turbulence of movement, of color, of light."
  • As a young man, Brakhage lived in San Francisco and New York associating with many other poets, musicians, painters and filmmakers, including Robert Duncan, Kenneth Rexroth, John Cage, Edgard Varese, Joseph Cornell, Maya Deren and Marie Menken. A youthful "poet-with-a-camera," Brakhage soon emerged as a significant film artist, evolving an entirely new form of first person, lyrical cinema.
  • Brakhage considers the camera analogous to the eye, and film analogous to vision. His concept of vision "includes such things as the flashing abstract patterns the eye sees when shut, visual memories, imaginations, hallucinations, daydreams and night dreams," notes Renan. "With distorting lenses, scratching, painting, superimpositions, editing and other methods of manipulating light, he has tried to put this composite vision on film." Considered the major figure in the break from traditional film to purely personal and visual preoccupations, Brakhage thinks "there is no place for an artist in the film studios." When he lived in New York he stayed with Maya Deren, the avant-garde filmmaker, was a friend of Marie Menken, also an experimental filmmaker, and worked with Joseph Cornell, the artist who suggested a film momento of the Third Avenue El, make by Brakhage, and titled "The Wonder Ring."
  • Brakhage married Jane Collom in 1957, and from the early 60s they lived in Rollinsville, Colorado, making films and raising their five children. Brakhage also continued to travel around the country and abroad becoming a leading figure of the American avant-garde film movement. He lived in Boulder from1986, and in 2002 moved to Canada with his second wife, Marilyn, and their two children.
  • Before his death in March, 2003, Brakhage had completed more than 350 films, ranging from the psycho-dramatic works of the early 1950s to autobiographical lyrics, mythological epics, "documents," and metaphorical film 'poems' -- variously employing his uniquely developed hand-held camera and rapid editing techniques, multiple superimpositions, collages, photographic abstractions, and elaborate hand-painting applied directly to the surface of the film. A deeply personal filmmaker, Brakhage's great project was to explore the nature of light and all forms of vision - while encompassing a vast range of subject matter. He frequently referred to his works as "visual music," or as documents of "moving visual thinking." The majority of his films are intentionally silent.
  • Brakhage taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and as Distinguished Professor of Film Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The recipient of three Honorary Degrees and numerous prestigious awards, he lectured extensively on filmmaking and the Arts, and is the author of 11 books - including his seminal 1963 work, Metaphors On Vision, and his more recent series of essays, Telling Time.
  • Brakhage's application of the art of vision has created many different kinds of film experiences. The eye learns to see things outside of their common context, as in "Nightcats", in which Brakhage approximates the vision of cats, or in "Anticipation of the Night", where he shows us the world through the innocent eyes of a child. For Brakhage, the camera-eye is capable of much more than realism. In fact, "The 'absolute realism' of the motion picture image is human invention," he says, "a twentieth-century Western illusion." He believes that the filmmaker can hand-hold the camera and inherit worlds of space, that he can use filters, such as fog, rain, light, glass, and he can "deliberately spit on the lens or wreck its focal intentions.". In sum, the reality of Brakhage is the reality of the "lost" art of vision itself. As he says, "To search for human visual realities man must, as in all other homo-motivation, transcend the original physical restrictions and inherit the world of eyes."
November 21, 2017
translations a
  • de-DE
November 1, 2017
images a
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October 11, 2017
images a
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August 12, 2017
images a
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August 7, 2017
en-US
biography a
  • Born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1933, Brakhage moved to Denver, Colorado at the age of six. He sang as a boy soprano soloist, dreamed of being a poet, and graduated from South High School in 1951 with a scholarship to Dartmouth. After one semester, he left to pursue a life in the Arts, returning to Denver to make his first film in 1952.
  • As a young man, Brakhage lived in San Francisco and New York associating with many other poets, musicians, painters and filmmakers, including Robert Duncan, Kenneth Rexroth, John Cage, Edgard Varese, Joseph Cornell, Maya Deren and Marie Menken. A youthful "poet-with-a-camera," Brakhage soon emerged as a significant film artist, evolving an entirely new form of first person, lyrical cinema.
  • Brakhage married Jane Collom in 1957, and from the early 60s they lived in Rollinsville, Colorado, making films and raising their five children. Brakhage also continued to travel around the country and abroad becoming a leading figure of the American avant-garde film movement. He lived in Boulder from1986, and in 2002 moved to Canada with his second wife, Marilyn, and their two children.
  • Before his death in March, 2003, Brakhage had completed more than 350 films, ranging from the psycho-dramatic works of the early 1950s to autobiographical lyrics, mythological epics, "documents," and metaphorical film 'poems' -- variously employing his uniquely developed hand-held camera and rapid editing techniques, multiple superimpositions, collages, photographic abstractions, and elaborate hand-painting applied directly to the surface of the film. A deeply personal filmmaker, Brakhage's great project was to explore the nature of light and all forms of vision - while encompassing a vast range of subject matter. He frequently referred to his works as "visual music," or as documents of "moving visual thinking." The majority of his films are intentionally silent.
  • Brakhage taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and as Distinguished Professor of Film Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The recipient of three Honorary Degrees and numerous prestigious awards, he lectured extensively on filmmaking and the Arts, and is the author of 11 books - including his seminal 1963 work, Metaphors On Vision, and his more recent series of essays, Telling Time.
June 16, 2017
place_of_birth a
  • Kansas City, Missouri, USA
deathday a
  • 2003-03-09
gender u
  • 0
  • 2
birthday a
  • 1933-01-14
also_known_as a
  • ["James Stanley Brakhage"]
translations a
  • en-US
May 6, 2017
images a
  • {"profile"=>{"file_path"=>"/oZrO0HQUSzgMYibGInI3vLHRpM7.jpg"}}
translations a
  • es-ES
December 1, 2015
imdb_id a
  • nm0104132
December 15, 2013
images a
  • {"profile"=>{"file_path"=>"/efN4unFZC6F4e9DSNeApR0ur9lz.jpg"}}

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