Biography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Charles Lederer (December 31, 1906 – March 5, 1976) was an American screenwriter and film director. He was born into a prominent theatrical family in New York, and after his parents divorced, was raised in California by his aunt, Marion Davies, mistress to newspaper publisher William Randolf Hearst. A child prodigy, he entered college at age 13, but dropped out after a few years to work as a journalist with Hearst's newspapers.

Lederer is recognized for his comic and acerbic adaptations and collaborative screenplays of the 1940s and early 1950s. His screenplays frequently delved into the corrosive influences of wealth and power. His comedy writing was considered among the best of the period, and he, along with writer friends Ben Hecht and Herman Mankiewicz, became major contributors to the film genre known as "screwball comedy".

Among his notable screenplays which he wrote or co-wrote, were The Front Page (1931), the critically acclaimed His Girl Friday (1940), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), The Spirit of St. Louis (1957), Ocean's 11 (1960), and Mutiny on the Bounty (1962).

With Ben Hecht, he co-wrote the original Kiss of Death which was to feature the actor Richard Widmark's chilling debut as the psychopathic killer with a giggle. In addition, he wrote and directed the 1959 film Never Steal Anything Small, an adaptation of a play by Maxwell Anderson and Rouben Mamoulian, starring James Cagney. The Spirit of St. Louis was Lederer's last significant film work. The films that followed that were primarily vehicles for established stars.

In 1954, he won three Tony Awards for the Broadway Musical Kismet, as Best Producer (Musical), as Best Author (Musical) with Luther Davis, and as co-author of the book which, with several collaborators, contributed to the Best Musical win.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Charles Lederer (December 31, 1906 – March 5, 1976) was an American screenwriter and film director. He was born into a prominent theatrical family in New York, and after his parents divorced, was raised in California by his aunt, Marion Davies, mistress to newspaper publisher William Randolf Hearst. A child prodigy, he entered college at age 13, but dropped out after a few years to work as a journalist with Hearst's newspapers.

Lederer is recognized for his comic and acerbic adaptations and collaborative screenplays of the 1940s and early 1950s. His screenplays frequently delved into the corrosive influences of wealth and power. His comedy writing was considered among the best of the period, and he, along with writer friends Ben Hecht and Herman Mankiewicz, became major contributors to the film genre known as "screwball comedy".

Among his notable screenplays which he wrote or co-wrote, were The Front Page (1931), the critically acclaimed His Girl Friday (1940), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), The Spirit of St. Louis (1957), Ocean's 11 (1960), and Mutiny on the Bounty (1962).

With Ben Hecht, he co-wrote the original Kiss of Death which was to feature the actor Richard Widmark's chilling debut as the psychopathic killer with a giggle. In addition, he wrote and directed the 1959 film Never Steal Anything Small, an adaptation of a play by Maxwell Anderson and Rouben Mamoulian, starring James Cagney. The Spirit of St. Louis was Lederer's last significant film work. The films that followed that were primarily vehicles for established stars.

In 1954, he won three Tony Awards for the Broadway Musical Kismet, as Best Producer (Musical), as Best Author (Musical) with Luther Davis, and as co-author of the book which, with several collaborators, contributed to the Best Musical win.

Personal Info

Known For Writing

Gender Male

Known Credits 38

Birthday 1906-12-31

Day of Death 1976-03-05

Place of Birth New York City, New York, USA

Official Site -

Also Known As

  • -

Writing TV ShowsMovies

1964 A Global Affair Screenplay
1962 Mutiny on the Bounty Screenplay
1962 Follow That Dream Screenplay
1960 Can-Can Screenplay
1960 Ocean's Eleven Screenplay
1959 It Started with a Kiss Screenplay
1959 Never Steal Anything Small Writer
1958 The Fiend Who Walked The West Writer
1957 Tip on a Dead Jockey Screenplay
1957 The Spirit of St. Louis Adaptation
1956 Gaby Screenplay
1955 Kismet Screenplay
1953 Gentlemen Prefer Blondes Screenplay
1952 Monkey Business Screenplay
1952 Fearless Fagan Screenplay
1952 O. Henry's Full House Writer
1951 The Thing from Another World Screenplay
1950 Wabash Avenue Story Screenplay
1949 Red, Hot and Blue Story
1949 I Was a Male War Bride Screenplay
1947 The Lady from Shanghai Writer
1947 Her Husband's Affairs Writer
1947 Ride the Pink Horse Screenplay
1947 Kiss of Death Screenplay
1943 Slightly Dangerous Screenplay
1943 The Youngest Profession Screenplay
1941 Love Crazy Screenplay
1940 Comrade X Screenplay
1940 I Love You Again Screenplay
1940 His Girl Friday Screenplay
1939 Broadway Serenade Screenplay
1939 Within the Law Screenplay
1937 Double Or Nothing Screenplay

Directing

1959 Never Steal Anything Small Director
1951 On the Loose Director
1942 Fingers at the Window Director

Crew

1935 Baby Face Harrington Additional Dialogue
1933 Topaze Sequence Supervisor
1931 The Front Page Additional Dialogue

By signing up for an account on TMDb, you can post directly to Twitter and Facebook.

You need to be logged in to continue. Click here to login or here to sign up.

Global

s focus the search bar
p open profile menu
esc close an open window
? open keyboard shortcut window

On media pages

b go back (or to parent when applicable)
e go to edit page

On TV season pages

(right arrow) go to next season
(left arrow) go to previous season

On TV episode pages

(right arrow) go to next episode
(left arrow) go to previous episode

On all image pages

a open add image window

On all edit pages

t open translation selector
ctrl+ s submit form

On discussion pages

n create new discussion
w toggle watching status
p toggle public/private
c toggle close/open
a open activity
r reply to discussion
l go to last reply
ctrl+ enter submit your message
(right arrow) next page
(left arrow) previous page