Biography

Barbara Loden (July 8, 1932 – September 5, 1980) was a Broadway Tony award-winning American stage and film actress, model, and stage/film director. She was the first woman to write, direct and star in her own feature film, Wanda, which won the International Critics Award at the 1970 Venice Film Festival. Loden also directed several off-Broadway plays.

Loden was a life member of the famed Actors Studio and appeared in several projects directed by her second husband, Elia Kazan, including Splendor in the Grass.

In 1970 Loden wrote, produced, directed, and starred in her own independent film, Wanda, made with the collaboration of cinematographer and editor Nicholas T. Proferes, on a meager budget of $115,000. Wanda is an semi-autobiographical portrait of a "passive, disconnected coal miner's wife who attaches herself to a petty crook."[4] Innovative in its cinéma vérité style, it was one of the few American films directed by a woman to be theatrically released at that time. Film critic David Thomson wrote, "Wanda is full of unexpected moments and raw atmosphere, never settling for cliché in situation or character." The film was the only American film accepted to, and which won, the International Critics' Prize at the Venice Film Festival in 1970, and was presented at the 1971 Cannes Film Festival. In 2010, with support from Gucci, the film was restored by the UCLA Film & Television Archive and screened at the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan.

Barbara Loden (July 8, 1932 – September 5, 1980) was a Broadway Tony award-winning American stage and film actress, model, and stage/film director. She was the first woman to write, direct and star in her own feature film, Wanda, which won the International Critics Award at the 1970 Venice Film Festival. Loden also directed several off-Broadway plays.

Loden was a life member of the famed Actors Studio and appeared in several projects directed by her second husband, Elia Kazan, including Splendor in the Grass.

In 1970 Loden wrote, produced, directed, and starred in her own independent film, Wanda, made with the collaboration of cinematographer and editor Nicholas T. Proferes, on a meager budget of $115,000. Wanda is an semi-autobiographical portrait of a "passive, disconnected coal miner's wife who attaches herself to a petty crook."[4] Innovative in its cinéma vérité style, it was one of the few American films directed by a woman to be theatrically released at that time. Film critic David Thomson wrote, "Wanda is full of unexpected moments and raw atmosphere, never settling for cliché in situation or character." The film was the only American film accepted to, and which won, the International Critics' Prize at the Venice Film Festival in 1970, and was presented at the 1971 Cannes Film Festival. In 2010, with support from Gucci, the film was restored by the UCLA Film & Television Archive and screened at the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan.

Personal Info

Known For Acting

Gender Female

Known Credits 13

Birthday 1932-07-08

Day of Death 1980-09-05

Place of Birth -

Official Site -

Also Known As

  • -

Acting TV ShowsMovies

1991 I Am Wanda as Interviewee
1975 The Frontier Experience as Delilah Fowler
1970 Wanda as Wanda Goronski
1968 The Dick Cavett Show (1 episode) as Herself - Guest
1968 Fade-In as Jean
1966 CBS Playhouse (1 episode)
1966 The Glass Menagerie as Laura Wingfield
1961 Splendor in the Grass as Virginia 'Ginny' Stamper
1961 Kraft Mystery Theatre (1 episode)
1960 Wild River as Betty Jackson
1958 Naked City (1 episode)
1958 Today Is Ours (128 episodes)

Directing

1975 The Frontier Experience Director
1975 The Boy Who Liked Deer Director
1970 Wanda Director

Production

1975 The Boy Who Liked Deer Producer
1975 The Frontier Experience Producer

Writing

1970 Wanda Writer

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