Discuss Blade Runner 2049

http://www.wisecrack.co/shows/wisecrackedition/blade-runner-2049/

The central question the original Blade Runner poses is: “What makes us human?”

The sequel continues to meditate on the importance of this question, but instead of retreading the same ground, it proposes something new that is essential to our humanity. And how does it do this? With holographic waifus and weird avant-garde literature.

The 1982 classic largely reflects on how attachment to memories, both for mankind and replicants, defines our humanity. Replicants recite poetry and ask the philosophical questions — “Like tears in rain.”

— while we’re shown debased humans who are drunk and diseased — all of this serves to further blur the distinction between human and replicant. 2049 explores this fuzzy replicant/human distinction in another way: with intimacy and physical connection. Or rather, the lack of it. The only real relationship K experiences is with his holographic girlfriend, Joi. K tries make their relationship more real by uploading her to a portable projector, allowing her to ‘free roam’.

desire for intimacy is subtly implanted all throughout the film. Niander Wallace, the creator of the new replicants, must feel and touch everything due to his blindness. Deckard’s daughter is locked in an isolation chamber and unable to touch the holograms that keep her entertained. There’s also a recurring motif of “feeling precipitation,” as I’ll call it. Joi, going outside for the first time, reaches out to “feel” the rain, but it goes right through her. Replicants wear gloves all throughout the film until K removes his own to feel the touch of falling snow. Earlier, K’s outstretched hand is covered in bees*s, although to be honest, I’m a little less sure about what the bees represent. We also see a group of **orphans collectively touch K, when he shows up to find the replicant child. And hologram Elvis sings, “take my hand,”

The film’s final shot shows Deckard trying to touch his daughter, but they’re obstructed by a glass wall. Through this, the importance of touch and connection is seen as innately human.

The second way 2049 explores the human/replicant distinction is in its exploration of how memory builds our personal narrative and how fallible that is. See, this is really interesting because whereas the original Blade Runner showed replicants making claims to humanity with memories, 2049 goes further, implying memories alone aren’t enough. You might remember the bizarre post-trauma stress test K has to go through twice. He sits in a barren room where a disembodied voice keeps saying stuff about a system of cells, while K responds with words like “interlinked,” “cells,” and “dreadfully.” This test is ripped straight from Vladimir Nabakov’s book, “Pale Fire.” The full excerpt is: “A system of cells interlinked within / cells interlinked within cells interlinked / within one stem. And dreadfully distinct / against the dark, a tall white fountain played.”

Later, we actually see Pale Fire in K’s apartment, and Joi asks him to read it. The premise of Pale Fire is essentially that you’ve got a poem by a fictional author, being analyzed in the footnotes by a fictional commentator — it’s a book about a commentary about a poem. Essentially, bookception. The whole cells interlinked passage details our fictional poet having a heart attack and seeing a vision of a tall white fountain. Later in the poem, he reads about someone else having a near death experience and seeing the same white fountain. Convinced that this shared vision proves the existence of an afterlife, the poet investigates further only to discover the line was a misprint, and the person said, “white mountain.”

Sensing a theme, here? These narratives that we build around objects and memories is at the heart of 2049’s discussion on what makes a ‘human’.

K’s memory of a wooden horse leads him to believe that he is this miracle child. “You’re special.”

But ... They are not his memories; they’re implants. Just as the fictional poet of Pale Fire’s revelation is shattered after realizing the “white fountain” was a misprint, K’s revelation is shattered after realizing the misimprint of a memory. And this is where the themes of intimacy and memory combine.

When he is given the choice to help the resistance by killing Deckard, he refuses. Instead of trusting his memories, he puts his faith in the intimacy and physical connection he yearns for. Thus, he lets this, not memory, guide him to his decision to reunite Deckard and his daughter. And just like the original Blade Runner, a replicant disobeys his “programming” to save a life, thus achieving meaning, and maybe even a soul.

There is so much more we could say about the thematic connections between 2049 and Pale Fire, like parental loss, the need for memorial, or even just the line, “Father Time, all gray and bent / emerged with his uneasy dog,” which sounds a lot like Deckard and his furry companion. Plus, what’s up with all the water imagery? The cell imagery? There’s a lot more to unpack, here, so let us know what you think in the comments, and maybe we’ll do an Earthling Cinema or a true Philosophy of. Until next time, thanks for watching. Peace.

Imo, K's MEMORY of the TOY HORSE isn't an IMPLANT but is REAL. And he's also the REAL CHILD, whereas the other girl in the GLASS BUBBLE is a HOLOGRAPHIC IMAGE (just like SINATRA was inside of his GLASS JAR).

Because the records K finds said RACHEL gave birth to TWINS and the GIRL TWIN died.

So apparently someone created a HOLOGRAPHIC IMAGE of the DEAD TWIN.

And the question becomes WHO would do that and WHY would they do it.

And the ANSWER seems to be RACHEL would have done it (because neither K nor DECKARD knew anything about her).

And that also seems to imply that the BONES K found buried under the TREE were NOT RACHEL's BONES ... which means they were most likely also planted there as part of still another RUSE ... and as a way to keep others from HUNTING for RACHEL ... the same way as K creates RECORDS that indicate DECKARD is dead when he isn't.

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Here's parts of still another article that also compares 2049 with the ORIGINAL film:

read:http://www.denofgeek.com/us/movies/blade-runner-2049/270789/how-blade-runner-2049-expands-on-the-original

How Blade Runner 2049 Expands on the Original

Ryan Lambie Feb 7, 2018

on the list of best sequels ever made. Blade Runner 2049 succeeded, in no small part, because of the specific way it expanded on the 1982 original. A lesser group of writers and directors might have looked at Ridley Scott's film and concluded that what it needed was ...

more chases through benighted city streets; more booming guns and brutal fights. Instead, director Denis Villeneuve and his collaborators took a much braver approach than just making a sci-fi action movie ...

The sequel feels expansive, certainly, with its locations extended to take in a spooky, irradiated Las Vegas and a ruined San Diego, but it's in its themes and storytelling that we see the greatest expansion of all.

Blade Runner 2049 ... creating a new story that both continues the themes of the original Blade Runner and builds on them for a new audience.

K is himself a replicant, and as a hunter of his own kind, is despised both by his human colleagues and other androids

Like Blade Runner's Roy Batty, K is therefore a replicant on his own existential journey: forced to repress his human responses - which are regularly checked by his superiors - K lives in a state of almost constant isolation. Deep down, he's desperately searching for some kind of greater connection; he has no family, no friends, and no real past, beyond the artificial memories implanted in his head. It's telling that his girlfriend isn't physically real - Joi's an artificially intelligent program

Where Roy Batty's search was for an extension on his life, K's search is about finding meaning and purpose: what if he was born and not created? What if his memories weren't engineered after all, but were half-forgotten slivers of a dangerous childhood? This, surely, would give his life meaning - unlike an ordinary replicant, he'd surely have a human soul. (As K says himself, "To be born is to have a soul, I guess.")

Although an android who wants to be human is far from a new idea in sci-fi, Blade Runner 2049's handling of it is quite unusual. The secret of true fulfilment, the film seems to suggest, is not through individualism, but through empathy and fighting for a greater cause. Time and again, Blade Runner 2049 points out the illusory nature of the soul:

memories can be copied and manipulated. Individuals can be recreated whole-cloth, seemingly down to their original personalities. Almost down to the cellular level, replicants are indistinguishable from humans.

Not that the film presents this as a bad thing by itself: the true horror in Blade Runner 2049 isn't the cloning, the artificial memories or the replicants, but the way all those things are used to cruel and inhumane ends. Niander Wallace, with his eyes like those of a dead fish, talks high-mindedly about his creations, but he has no more compassion for them than the owner of a factory that manufactures electronic calculators.

When K embarks on his journey, he's initially obsessed with the idea of his own status; it's as the story moves on, opening out the world as it moves from desolate location to desolate location, that he begins to realise that what he is doesn't necessarily matter - it's what he does with his life that counts.

This, we'd argue, is Blade Runner 2049's greatest triumph as a sequel to Blade Runner: yes, its vistas are as big and bleakly beautiful as we could have hoped. Its thriller plot is, if anything, more coherent and tidily delineated than the first. But where the sequel really excels is in its continuation of Blade Runner's grand themes - the meaning of our existence, the nature of memory, and what makes us truly human.

As Philip K Dick often concluded in his novels, Blade Runner 2049 offers up the suggestion that it's the replicants - enslaved, marginalised, oppressed - aren't just more human than human, but more humane.

Let's face it, if a character as self-absorbed and cruel as Niander Wallace has a soul simply because he's human, then maybe a soul isn't worth all that much after all.

What's also interesting is how it also SUMS UP nicely the other debate that RENO and I were having here a couple of days ago over on another topic.

https://www.themoviedb.org/movie/335984-blade-runner-2049/discuss/5a74fb0a9251410597027446?page=1

https://www.themoviedb.org/movie/335984-blade-runner-2049/discuss/5a74fb0a9251410597027446?page=2#last

Is it possible this Ryan Lambie could have been reading what we said???

:relaxed:

BUMP

Although I did like BR 2049 there is a major flaw at the heart of the movie when it is supposed to be a sequel of the original BR .And the question at the heart of this flaw is this "How can two replicants have a child?" because since the original workprint of BR was released in the Early 90's for selected viewings it was heavily implied that Deckard is a replicant and on every consecutive cut (The Director's Cut and The Final Cut)this is even more implied and even Scott has confirmed in interviews and on the audio commentary that Deckard is a replicant.So how can Rachel and Deckard have a kid since they both were replicants? The most revealing hint in the original was the unicorn dream and Gaff's origami unicorn(And no the unicorn dream sequence was not an afterthought that was recorded later or a leftover from Legend as some have suggested that was edited into movie In fact the original sequence of the dream—was showing Deckard intercut with the running unicorn— it was not found in a print of sufficient quality for the Director's Cut.so they were forced to use a different print that shows only the unicorn running, without any intercutting to Deckard) The Final Cut showed even more evidence that after Deckard was saved by Rachel from Leon when we are back at his apartment and he is cleaning off the blood in the kitchen we see Deckard look up and we see his eyes "glowing" (like the eyes of the owl,Rachel,Roy and Pris meaning that only the eyes of replicants glow) also this was not an afterthought because this segment was also featured in the original workprint.

1 Replicants are bioengineered humans, designed by Tyrell Corporation for use off-world. Their enhanced strength made them ideal slave labor After a series of violent rebellions, their manufacture became prohibited and Tyrell Corp went bankrupt. The collapse of ecosystems in the mid 2020s led to the rise of industrialist Niander Wallace, Whose mastery of synthetic farming averted famine Wallace acquired the remains of Tyrell Corp and created a new line of replicants who obey. Many older model replicants--NEXUS 8s with open-ended lifespans--survived. They are hunted down and "Retired" Those that hunt them still go by the name... Blade Runner

Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/movie_script.php?movie=blade-runner-2049

@Nexus71 said:

Although I did like BR 2049 there is a major flaw at the heart of the movie when it is supposed to be a sequel of the original BR .And the question at the heart of this flaw is this "How can two replicants have a child?" because since the original workprint of BR was released in the Early 90's for selected viewings it was heavily implied that Deckard is a replicant and on every consecutive cut (The Director's Cut and The Final Cut)this is even more implied and even Scott has confirmed in interviews and on the audio commentary that Deckard is a replicant.So how can Rachel and Deckard have a kid since they both were replicants?

When DECKARD is captured in VEGAS and taken to the PYRAMID where he meets WALLACE (who's replaced TYRELL), Wallace IMPLIES that the meeting between RACHEL and DECKARD was PLANNED beforehand, because TYRELL had also already done the MATH, and already KNEW they'd be INSTANTLY attracted to one another:

Is it the same,... now as then,... the moment you met her? All these years you looked back on that day, drunk on the memory of its perfection. How shiny, her lips! How instant, your connection! Did it never occur to you, that's why you were summoned in the first place? Designed to do nothing short of, fall for her, right then and there. All to make that single, perfect... specimen. That is, if you were designed. Love, or mathematical precision. Yes? No?

Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/movie_script.php?movie=blade-runner-2049

Remember how RACHEL has the MEMORIES of TYRELL'S NIECE??? That probably also means he'd know what kind of MALE she'd be attracted to. Remember how RACHEL sits at the PIANO with the PHOTOS on top of what's suppose to be DECKARD's relatives??? Then she also lets down her hair so that she looks like them??? And then she also plays the MUSIC that she KNEW DECKARD would have heard his family playing before???

Wallace might be right. TYRELL may have already KNOWN and PLANNED for RACHEL to breed with DECKARD, which also means TYRELL KNEW what WALLACE wants to know (which is how to make REPLICANTS that can get PREGNANT, give BIRTH, and BREED just like HUMANS do).

But when ROY KILLS TYRELL that probably also means the SECRET of how to create a REPLICANT that can REPRODUCE also went with TYRELL to his grave.

And then the BLACKOUT may have also WIPED OUT any info that TYRELL may have left behind that explained how to be able to create such REPLICANTS???

My theory is K is the son of DECKARD ( records K finds indicate that RACHEL had TWINS) and that MARIETTE (the REPLICANT he had sex with) is PREGNANT.

So that would also mean K's got the ability to IMPREGNATE other REPLICANTS (because he's also got the same DNA as RACHEL and DECKARD).

The most revealing hint in the original was the unicorn dream and Gaff's origami unicorn(And no the unicorn dream sequence was not an afterthought that was recorded later or a leftover from Legend as some have suggested that was edited into movie In fact the original sequence of the dream—was showing Deckard intercut with the running unicorn— it was not found in a print of sufficient quality for the Director's Cut.so they were forced to use a different print that shows only the unicorn running, without any intercutting to Deckard) The Final Cut showed even more evidence that after Deckard was saved by Rachel from Leon when we are back at his apartment and he is cleaning off the blood in the kitchen we see Deckard look up and we see his eyes "glowing" (like the eyes of the owl,Rachel,Roy and Pris meaning that only the eyes of replicants glow) also this was not an afterthought because this segment was also featured in the original workprint.

YES you're right, his EYES did GLOW, and we also hear RACHEL asking him if he'd ever given himself the SAME TEST that he gave her (which also seems to indicate that RACHEL may have READ HIS RECORDS and knew MORE about him than he knew about himself … the same way as he'd read her FILE and knew more about her than she knew about herself).

Still another thing that indicates DECKARD's a REPLICANT is the way he LIVED there in VEGAS where the RADIATION level was the HIGHEST (which is also how K was able to find and locate him by way of the RADIATION level on the wooden horse).

So IF he's HUMAN, he'd most likely also have died from RADIATION SICKNESS.

And the UNICORN motief would also seem to indicate RACHEL and DECKARD are like ADAM and EVE ... due to the way they'd also be ONE of a KIND ... whenever it comes to being the kind of REPLICANTS that can REPRODUCE.

And if they were a SPECIAL SPECIES of REPLICANTS, then maybe that could also explain the reason why they were allowed to escape???

Because we also know the other BLADE RUNNER had been there at DECKARD's place due to the way he left behind the TIN FOIL UNICORN that he created.

And IF MARIETTE also gets pregnant, then Apparently REPRODUCTION would also be something that can happen to a female REPLICANT who has sex with one of RACHEL's offspring (even IF she isn't one of the UNICORNS or SPECIAL SPECIES of REPLICANTS created by TYRELL)???

They've just got to MAKE another CONTINUATION of this story.

If not another FILM VERSION of it ... then HBO should at least try to make a LIMITED SERIES of it for us ... where we explore still more about the results of the 3 way sex that took place between K and MARIETTE and JOI.

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