Hidden Figures

December 10, 2016

The untold story of Katherine G. Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson – brilliant African-American women working at NASA and serving as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in history – the launch of astronaut John Glenn into orbit. The visionary trio crossed all gender and race lines to inspire generations to dream big.

12 Years a Slave

October 18, 2013

In the pre-Civil War United States, Solomon Northup, a free black man from upstate New York, is abducted and sold into slavery. Facing cruelty as well as unexpected kindnesses Solomon struggles not only to stay alive, but to retain his dignity. In the twelfth year of his unforgettable odyssey, Solomon’s chance meeting with a Canadian abolitionist will forever alter his life.

The Banker

March 6, 2020

In the 1960s, two entrepreneurs hatch an ingenious business plan to fight for housing integration—and equal access to the American Dream.

The Butler

August 16, 2013

A look at the life of Cecil Gaines who served eight presidents as the White House's head butler from 1952 to 1986, and had a unique front-row seat as political and racial history was made.

Red Tails

January 19, 2012

The story of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first African-American pilots to fly in a combat squadron during World War II.

Malcolm X

November 18, 1992

A tribute to the controversial black activist and leader of the struggle for black liberation. He hit bottom during his imprisonment in the '50s, he became a Black Muslim and then a leader in the Nation of Islam. His assassination in 1965 left a legacy of self-determination and racial pride.

Glory

December 15, 1989

Robert Gould Shaw leads the US Civil War's first all-black volunteer company, fighting prejudices of both his own Union army and the Confederates.

13th

October 7, 2016

An in-depth look at the prison system in the United States and how it reveals the nation's history of racial inequality.

Selma

December 25, 2014

"Selma," as in Alabama, the place where segregation in the South was at its worst, leading to a march that ended in violence, forcing a famous statement by President Lyndon B. Johnson that ultimately led to the signing of the Voting Rights Act.

The Tuskegee Airmen

August 25, 1995

During the Second World War, a special project is begun by the US Army Air Corps to integrate African American pilots into the Fighter Pilot Program. Known as the "Tuskegee Airman" for the name of the airbase at which they were trained, these men were forced to constantly endure harassement, prejudice, and much behind the scenes politics until at last they were able to prove themselves in combat.

The story of Jack Johnson, the first African American Heavyweight boxing champion.

The history of warfare as it relates to global Black society, broken down into 7 chapters that examines the ways the system of racism wages warfare from a historical, psychological, sexual, biological, health, educational, and military perspective.

Not Black Enough

April 28, 2017

A deep look at the class warfare and the contradictions that African-Americans face within their own community when many of them are ostracized because they are “not black enough.” An analysis of the reasons behind these absurd acts of hatred.

Crownsville Hospital: From Lunacy to Legacy is a feature-length documentary film highlighting the history of the Crownsville State Mental Hospital in Crownsville, MD.

River of Hope

February 15, 2020

"River of Hope" tells the story of how a former slave Mary Barnes Cabell and her children helped found the first college for African Americans in West Virginia. Based on true events.

Documentary feature exploring the rise of African-Americans to positions of greatness in American sports. Stories are told of boxers, tennis players, runners, and basketball players, athletes who either suffered the indignities of racism, helped break down its walls, or enjoyed the opportunities afforded by past struggles.

A documentary that chronicles the rise and decline of the black-owned ethnic beauty industry in America.

Can You Hear God Crying?

November 11, 2014

World première recording of Hannibal Lokumbe's 'spritatorio' Can You Hear God Crying, which combines jazz, gospel and chamber music with West African prayers and songs. The piece, commissioned by Philadelphia philanthropist Carole Haas Gravagno, is about the composer's great-great-grandfather, who was born in the Sahara, kidnapped and enslaved in Liberia, and sold at auction in Charleston, S.C. He escaped to Texas, where he bought land and had a family.

Guion

May 5, 2018

a short, narrative biopic that tells the story of Guion Bluford, as he grapples with the reality that he is to become the first African American man in space.

The explosive documentary from Black Channel Films daring to ask the question "Is it still just racism or is it a race war?" NOW IS THE TIME TO ASK IS IT STILL JUST "RACISM" OR IS IT A RACE WAR? RACE WAR IS THE FIRST DOCUMENTARY IN HISTORY THAT EXAMINES EVERY LEVEL OF AMERICAN SOCIETY TO EXPLORE THE MOST EXPLOSIVE ISSUE FACING AMERICA ALL OF OUR YESTERDAYS . . . AND TOMORROW.

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