173 shows

  • 20th Century Fox Television
  • Los Angeles, California, USA
  • US
  • Homepage

My Friend Flicka

February 10, 1956

My Friend Flicka is a 39-episode western television series set at the fictitious Goose Bar Ranch in Wyoming at the turn of the 20th century. The program was filmed in color but initially aired in black and white on CBS at 7:30 p.m. Fridays from February 10, 1956, to February 1, 1957. It was a mid-season replacement for Gene Autry's The Adventures of Champion. Both series, however failed in the ratings against ABC's The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin.

After the initial Friday airing, viewers could still find the series on CBS Saturdays at 7 p.m. Eastern during March 1957, on Sundays at 6 p.m. from April to May 1957, and on Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. from June to August 1957. NBC carried the program in color at 6:30 p.m. Sunday from September to December 1957 and at 7 p.m. Sunday from January to May 1958. In subsequent years, the series aired mostly on Saturday mornings on all networks. The Disney Channel ran it on Monday evenings in the mid-1980s. Over the years many viewers were unaware that the series produced episodes for only a single season.

My Friend Flicka starred native Canadian Johnny Washbrook as Ken McLaughlin, a boy devoted to his horse Flicka, Swedish for "little girl", but actually an Arabian sorrel named Wahana. Gene Evans played the authoritarian father Rob McLaughlin, a former U.S. Army cavalry officer. Anita Louise was cast as the gentle-spirited mother, Nell. Frank Ferguson portrayed Gus Broeberg, the loyal ranch hand. Flicka is based on a novel by Mary O'Hara, written at the Remount Ranch, located between Laramie and Cheyenne, Wyoming. Some Internet sites say that the series is set in Montana, where some of the filming was done. The majority of the filming, however, was at Fox Movie Ranch. My Friend Flicka holds the distinction of having been the first television series filmed by 20th Century Fox. A 1943 film, My Friend Flicka, starred Roddy McDowall as Ken.

The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

September 29, 1959

The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis is an American sitcom that aired on CBS from 1959 to 1963. The series and several episode scripts were adapted from a 1951 collection of short stories of the same name, written by Max Shulman, who had also written a feature film adaptation of his short stories for MGM in 1953, The Affairs of Dobie Gillis.

The series revolved around the life of teenager/young adult Dobie Gillis, who, along with his best friend, beatnik Maynard G. Krebs, struggles against the forces of his life - high school, the military, college, and his parents - as he aspires to attain both wealth and dates with girls. The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis was produced by Martin Manulis Productions in association with 20th Century Fox Television. Creator Shulman also wrote the theme song in collaboration with Lionel Newman.

Five Fingers

October 4, 1959

Five Fingers is an NBC adventure/drama series set in Europe during the Cold War loosely based on the 1952 film 5 Fingers, starring James Mason and Danielle Darrieux. It ran from October 3, 1959, to January 9, 1960.

David Hedison starred as 32-year-old Victor Sebastian, an American counterintelligence officer with the code name "Five Fingers". Luciana Paluzzi played Simone Genet, Sebastian's secretary and romantic interest. Paul Burke played Robertson, Sebastian's contact man.

Five Fingers itself was based on the book Operation Cicero by L.C. Moyzisch and on the memoirs of Elyesa Bazna. Bazna was something of an antihero in real life; the television series transformed the character from a World War II-era mercenary Albanian into a Cold War era heroic American. Sebastian posed as a Communist to gain information on party activities. His public cover was that of a theatrical booking agent for clubs and cafes throughout Europe.

Valentine's Day

September 18, 1964

Valentine's Day is a 1964 comedy television series that appeared on ABC's schedule. The series starred Tony Franciosa as Valentine Farrow, a swinging Manhattan publishing executive, and Jack Soo, later of Barney Miller as Rocky Sin, Farrow's poker-playing con-artist valet. The show was created by Hal Kanter and lasted only one season.

One noteworthy episode was produced as a tie-in to the movie Rio Conchos, in which Franciosa co-starred; he played both Valentine and his Mexican character from the feature.

The Loner

September 18, 1965

The Loner is an American western series that ran for less than one season on CBS from 1965 to 1966, under the alternate sponsorship of Philip Morris and Procter & Gamble.

The Green Hornet

September 9, 1966

The Green Hornet is a television series on the ABC US television network that aired for the 1966–1967 TV season starring Van Williams as the Green Hornet/Britt Reid and Bruce Lee as Kato.

Julia

September 17, 1968

Julia is an American sitcom notable for being one of the first weekly series to depict an African American woman in a non-stereotypical role. Previous television series featured African American lead characters, but the characters were usually servants. The show stars actress and singer Diahann Carroll, and ran for 86 episodes on NBC from September 17, 1968 to March 23, 1971. The series was produced by Savannah Productions, Inc., Hanncar Productions, Inc., and 20th Century-Fox Television.

During pre-production, the proposed series title was Mama's Man. The series was also unique in that it was among the few situation comedies in the late 1960s that did not use a laugh track; however, 20th Century-Fox Television added them when the series was reissued for syndication and cable rebroadcasts in the late 1980s.

Lancer

September 24, 1968

Lancer is an American Western series that aired on CBS from September 1968, to May 1970. The series stars Andrew Duggan, James Stacy, and Wayne Maunder as a father with two half-brother sons, an arrangement similar to the more successful Bonanza on NBC.

Room 222

September 11, 1969

Room 222 is an American comedy-drama television series produced by 20th Century Fox Television. The series aired on ABC for 112 episodes from September 17, 1969 until January 11, 1974. The show was broadcast on Wednesday evenings at 9:00 for its first two seasons before settling into its best-remembered time slot of Friday evenings at 9:00, following The Brady Bunch and The Partridge Family, and preceding The Odd Couple and Love, American Style.

In 1970, Room 222 earned Emmy Awards in three categories: Outstanding New Series, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series, and Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series.

Bracken's World

September 19, 1969

Bracken's World is an American drama series broadcast on NBC from September 19, 1969 to December 25, 1970. The series was created and produced by Dorothy Kingsley.

Cade's County

September 19, 1971

Cade's County was about Sam Cade, the tough but sensitive sheriff of sprawling Madrid County located somewhere in the American Southwest. Between chases and shootouts, the show dealt with a number of relevant 1970s issues such as the plight of the Native American.

Return to Peyton Place

April 3, 1972

Return to Peyton Place is an American daytime soap opera which aired on NBC from April 3, 1972 to January 4, 1974. The series was a spin-off of the primetime drama series Peyton Place rather than an adaptation of the 1959 novel of the same name by Grace Metalious.

The storylines from the daytime show were a continuation of those from the primetime series. Both James Lipton and Gail Kobe worked as writers on the series during its run. Frank Ferguson, Evelyn Scott, and Patricia Morrow reprised their roles from the earlier series.

Selena Cross, a major character in the original novel and the films both it and its sequel inspired, had not been included in the primetime TV series because her storyline was considered too risque at the time. She was a featured character in the daytime soap.

Anna and the King

September 17, 1972

Anna and the King is a short-lived sitcom broadcast in the United States by CBS as part of its 1972 fall lineup.

M*A*S*H

September 17, 1972

The 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital is stuck in the middle of the Korean war. With little help from the circumstances they find themselves in, they are forced to make their own fun. Fond of practical jokes and revenge, the doctors, nurses, administrators, and soldiers often find ways of making wartime life bearable.

Orson Welles' Great Mysteries

September 1, 1973

Orson Welles' Great Mysteries was a British television series The series was an anthology of different tales. Each episode was introduced by Orson Welles, who was the only regular actor in the series.

In the opening titles, Welles would be shown in silhouette as he walked through a hallway towards the camera, smoking a cigar and outfitted in a broad-brimmed hat and a huge cloak, the outfit itself being a nod to his having provided the voice of The Shadow in the radio program. When he actually appeared on-screen to introduce the episodes, his face would be all that would be shown, in extreme close-up and very low lighting.

The New Perry Mason

September 16, 1973

The New Perry Mason is a revival of the long-running hit television series about Erle Stanley Gardner's brilliant defense attorney.

Run, Joe, Run

September 7, 1974

Run, Joe, Run was a Saturday morning television program that aired on NBC from 1974 to 1976. It centered around Joe, a German Shepherd in the military's K-9 Corp., and his master, Sergeant Will Corey. One day, during training, Joe was falsely accused of attacking his master, a crime for which the dog would be put to sleep as punishment. However, he escaped before being killed and a $200 bounty was put on his head.

Sgt. Corey believed Joe was innocent and also pursued him, hoping to find Joe before the authorities did. While on the run, Joe helped people he encountered.

During the show's second season, Sgt. Corey, having never found Joe, was called back to duty. Joe then teamed with a hiker, Josh McCoy, and continued to help others, all the while still on the run.

The show was considered as a cross between Lassie and The Fugitive. Like The Fugitive, and later, The Incredible Hulk, it centered around a falsely accused person running from authorities and helping out people he meets along the way. The show was produced by William P. D'Angelo Productions, who also produced the NBC young adult drama, Westwind.

Family Feud

July 12, 1976

Family Feud is an American game show in which two families compete against each other in a contest to name the most popular responses to a survey question posed to 100 people. The show was created by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman in the United States, and now airs in numerous local formats worldwide.

Since its premiere in 1976, Family Feud has aired during 30 non-consecutive seasons. The show premiered on ABC and was hosted by Richard Dawson from 1976 until it was cancelled in 1985, by which point it had been popular on both the network and in syndication. The series was revived by CBS in 1988 with Ray Combs hosting and expanded to an hour-long format in 1992 until its cancellation in 1993. Combs also hosted the accompanying syndicated series until 1994, when he was replaced by Dawson for one season, which also expanded to an hour-long format before being cancelled in 1995. Later versions were hosted by Louie Anderson, Richard Karn, and John O'Hurley. Since the 2010–11 television season, Family Feud has been hosted by comedian/actor Steve Harvey.

The show's ratings were said to have improved significantly under Harvey. Family Feud's ratings were said to have improved a full 40% from the prior year back when John O'Hurley hosted. During the 2011–12 season, the fast-rising game show averaged a 4.0 and became the 5th highest rated show in all of syndication. As of the 2012–13 season, Family Feud has regularly been the second highest rated show in all of daytime television programming. In 2013, TV Guide ranked it #3 in its list of the 60 greatest game shows ever.

James at 15

September 5, 1977

James at 15 is an American drama series that aired on NBC during the 1977-1978 season. The series was preceded by the 1977 made-for-TV movie James at 15, which aired on Monday September 5, 1977 and was intended as a pilot for the series. Both were written by Dan Wakefield, a journalist and fiction writer whose novel Going All the Way, a tale of coming of age in the 1950s, had led to his being contacted by David Sontag of Twentieth Century Fox. David Sontag had had a lunch meeting in NY with Paul Klein, the head of programming at NBC. At lunch Klein said he needed a series for Sunday night. On the spot Sontag created the idea for a coming of age series seen through the eyes of a teenage boy including his dreams, fantasies, and hopes. Klein loved the idea and asked Sontag who would write it. Sontag suggested Dan Wakefield.

Young Dan'l Boone

September 12, 1977

Young Dan'l Boone is a short-lived TV series broadcast on CBS for only four episodes from September 12 to October 10, 1977. The series followed Daniel Boone on his adventures before he was married. His 3 companions were Peter Dawes, a 12-year-old English boy, a runaway slave named Hawk, and a Cherokee named Tsiskwa. Meanwhile, Rebecca Bryan waits at home hoping she and Daniel would marry someday.

Can't find a movie or TV show? Login to create it.

Global

s focus the search bar
p open profile menu
esc close an open window
? open keyboard shortcut window

On media pages

b go back (or to parent when applicable)
e go to edit page

On TV season pages

(right arrow) go to next season
(left arrow) go to previous season

On TV episode pages

(right arrow) go to next episode
(left arrow) go to previous episode

On all image pages

a open add image window

On all edit pages

t open translation selector
ctrl+ s submit form

On discussion pages

n create new discussion
w toggle watching status
p toggle public/private
c toggle close/open
a open activity
r reply to discussion
l go to last reply
ctrl+ enter submit your message
(right arrow) next page
(left arrow) previous page

Want to rate or add this item to a list?

Login